"Being on the Oregon Health Plan means support for me and others. It means education, participation, helping others, seeing others succeed, and healthy living."
-Ruby
“Being on the Oregon Health Plan means support for me and others. It means education, participation, helping others, seeing others succeed, and healthy living.” -Ruby

Alice Taylor, CMW, NP, MPH

  • I am a certified nurse midwife providing women’s health and midwifery care. I have been practicing in Curry County for 38 years. I see the difference the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is making in the lives of folks in my community.

    The ACA has provided health insurance for young people and families that were previously uninsured. Patients are able to access care. This has allowed me to provide effective contraception and timely prenatal care to many that otherwise would have fallen through the cracks. An unplanned pregnancy and exposure to substances for a developing fetus is extremely costly on many levels –  to the woman, a family, our community and our nation. The ACA saves enormous amounts of money just in the area of reproductive health.

    A very powerful outcome of the ACA and health care transformation has been the linkages of resources for patients. Specifically, the private healthcare sector and the public healthcare sector are now linking resources to provide the best care and referrals to programs that benefit everyone, but especially our youngest citizens.

    The ACA supports addressing the upstream social determinants of health, such as readiness for Kindergarten, that have downstream effects that impact health and health care costs. Our private practice is now working closely with Early Head Start, Head Start, Healthy Families Oregon and our local public libraries in group prenatal visits, called Centering Pregnancy, an evidence-based program that decreases the pre-term birth rate. This collaboration would not be happening in our rural community without the ACA.” — Alice Taylor, CMW, NP, MPH

Dori's Story

Connie's Story

  • While she was uninsured, she became addicted to street drugs, spent time in jail, and says she used the Emergency Room as her doctor. In April 2014, after getting drug treatment, she applied for coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expansion of Medicaid coverage. Once she got coverage, she got a regular primary care physician (PCP), received dental care, and mental health care.
    Before her new teeth, she couldn’t eat, had constant infections, and didn’t want to talk to people. After getting her new teeth, infections and ER visits stopped and she now has a beautiful smile. A single ER visit costs as much as her entire dental care.
    Prior to getting insurance, she was not able to get mental health care. Now she has regular visits with a mental health provider. They continue to work on adjusting her medication. She was also diagnosed with a thyroid condition which is now being treated.